April 2009October 2008July-September 2008June ArchiveMay Archive
Home
Methadone Forum
Rate Your Program
"What's Your Story?"
"The Director's View"
Talk Back
Guestbook
Addiction Science
An Addict's View
Bits and Pieces
Dedications
Drug Tests
Erosion Of Rights
Federal Regulations
 Frequent Questions
Georgia Opiate Clinics
Georgia Regulations
Hepatitis HCV
   Internet  Resources
 Legal Issues
Library
Methadone Talk
Methadone and Pain
Methadone Interactions
Methadone Maintenance
Myths Of Methadone
News And Views
  Opiate Drug Treatment
     Overdosed
Pregnancy
Rights of Patients
Suboxone
Video Library
For Women Only


"If you do not like something...change it!    If you can't change it...change your attitude."     - Mary Rosenthal

Greetings!  I would like to welcome all of you to "The Director's View."   I can hardly believe half of the year is gone.  Time passes too quickly for me.  I can't find enough hours to get everything done.  I am positive I am not alone.  Many of you are having similar problems.  Am I right?  If any of you can find a way to add more hours to each day --- promise me I will be the first one you will share it with.

I apologize... I was late in obtaining and compiling all I wanted to speak to you about.  Our  phones have been ringing off the hooks lately.  We could really use some people to assist us. We are trying to handle all of it as best we can.  If you wrote to us and we haven't answered...    we ask for your patience.  We always answer each and everyone of you.   

Yesterday, was Mother's Day...   I want to take the time to recognize all of our Mothers.  Substance Abuse has torn to shreds many relationships, not only the ones between marital partners. I'm talking about the ones with our children. It's
time we begin to start  tearing down the walls we have constructed to protect ourselves.  Pain is inevitable if you love someone.

I am speaking to all the mothers because you are mature and have lived much longer.  It is time to start repairing the relationship with your children...   If they have substance-abuse problems ...they need you.  It is easy to give up on them.
I am asking you please don't take the easy way out...   Addiction is a treatable disease. Set aside a time to touch base with them.  - - - Let them know you love them. Don't assume they know.  Proceed slowly...   It takes time for wounds to heal. Yours and theirs.   

Take the time to give them your undivided attention.No criticism. No judgement.
Let them know you are there for them.  ---Take the time to read about the latest research published on addiction. You must be able to understand the physiology of the disease.  - - -If you need any help at all - we are here for you twenty-four
hours every day of the year.  We welcome your calls at any hour of the day or night. Reach out to them today because we never know what tomorrow may bring.   

"Happy Mother's Day" from all of us at Medical Assisted Treatment of America.



Take The First Step                                 Dr. Michael Levy
Daily News of Newburyport

Dear Dr. Levy: I read your response to the reader who asked if the recent rise in methadone deaths was due to take-home doses from clinics. I want to thank you profusely for your response that it is primarily due to the increase in methadone being prescribed for chronic pain.

There are several groups doing their best to fault the clinics and seeking to rescind all take-home privileges from clinic patients. It is much easier to blame and stigmatize a population that is already downtrodden, stigmatized and struggling to recover, as opposed to pain patients (and those who steal from them).  

Methadone has gotten an incredible amount of bad press in the past several years, much of it undeserved, and I always try to take time to write and thank anyone who speaks out with the truth about methadone maintenance treatment.

A: Thank you for your letter. You are correct that often, due to the stigma in our society surrounding drug addiction, many look at methadone treatment programs in disparaging ways and quickly target such programs when problems with methadone are seen.

The Drug Enforcement Agency recently announced that pharmaceutical companies have agreed to restrict access to 40-milligram doses of methadone beginning next year. Going forward,40-milligram tablets of methadone will be distributed to hospitals and methadone treatment programs only and will be used primarily for the treatment of opiate addiction, not for chronic pain. In fact, the 40-milligram tablet of methadone is not approved for chronic pain treatment.This demonstrates that authorities have realized methadone treatment programs are not responsible for the increase in overdoses from methadone, but rather that they are due to the proliferation of larger tablets of methadone from other sources.

Monday, May 12, 2008        Copyright©  1999-2008 cnhi,inc.


Meridian-Idaho (AP)  - Idaho's first methadone-maintenance clinic has opened in Meridian to help people with drug addictions maintain productive lives.   

The Center for Behavioral Health opened earlier this month and has ten patients.

The center helps addicts by allowing them to use methadone with the goal of eventually weaning them off opiates. 

Previously, Idaho patients had been driving to methadone clinics in Ontario, Oregon and Ogden, Utah, because the state had banned such clinics.

Idaho lawmakers changed the law during the 2007 Legislature at the request of the center's owners, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, and the Idaho State Board of Pharmacy.

Idaho drug czar Debbie Field also asked for the change.

She says the clinic will offer a little more brightness in the future for people who are recovering from addictions.  

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press.
Source:  LocalNEWS8.COM 
      April 23, 2008  4:04 PM ET

          Announcing:
       Grand Opening of         
 
  " New Day Treatment Center"   
     Atlanta, Georgia 30311 
           


New Day Treatment Center opens its doors to the public Wednesday, May 14.  It will be welcomed by many living in the area. It is located at 2563 Martin Luther
King Jr. Drive S.W.  Atlanta, Georgia 30311. 

At " New Day Treatment Center,Inc." you'll surround yourself with the most
experienced and extremely humanitarian group of professional medical and counseling staff.  We treat our patients with dignity, we know your need and believe in your dream.

They open their doors at 06:00 AM for dosing Monday through Friday and close at  12:00 AM. They open on Saturday from 07:00 AM -11:00 AM.  Sundays they are closed.

Daily Dosing Fee is $12.00 and they offer both liquid and diskettes. They chose to use Roxane© because they want to retain their patients by offering the best. 

The Intake Fee is $60.00.  No appointment is needed.  There is no charge if you are Transfer Patient.  There is no charge for a Peak & Trough nor an HIV Test.  It
sounds very reasonable to me. 

I can say I personally spent time talking with the owner and you couldn't ask for a better person.  I can say she is a very caring and compassionate person and truly has the desire to assist you in turning your life around.

Presently they only have one counselor but I can highly recommend Him.  He was my very first counselor when I started on Methadone Maintenance (1993).
You will like Him because He treats you with dignity and respect. He works with you and He can identify with your pain. 

What more can I say? If you live in the vicinity---give them a call at 404.699.7774. Let them know Deborah sent you. I promise you will thank me for days and days to come.  If you are interested in more information and a map showing you how to find New Day Treatment Center then click on the link below.

http://www.NewDayTreatmentCenter.com

Source:  New Day Treatment Center,Inc.
              Farida Zohouri,Owner

State-Funded Buprenorphine
Pass the word around if you
live in Washington.
 
Something to talk about! 


Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) added Buprenorphine to the list of Medicaid reimbursed medications on September 22, 2003. The DSHS Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse (DASA) in conjunction with the DSHS Medical Assistance Administration published the limitations and  protocol in their Prescription Drug Program's Expedited Prior Authorization List.

Medicaid funded recipients are required to meet an eligibility criterion, which includes participation in a state certified chemical dependency treatment program in order to access reimbursement. The criterion is designed to address short-term stabilization for clients with mild dependency and a six-month limitation was placed on Medicaid prescriptions. Clients in need of longer-term maintenance are referred to an opiate treatment program.

Since the introduction of the protocol in Washington State, the six-month payment limitation has become a topic of discussion among health care providers that have witnessed substantial benefits with clients who are dually diagnosed in terms of increased treatment program participation, abstinence, and reduced emergency room costs. DASA and MAA are conducting discussions about a possible exemption to the criteria for this special population that may extend the length of time the medication may be prescribed.

Sourcehttp://www.aatod.org


"When things go wrong as they sometimes will,
When the road you're trudging
seems all up hill.
When the funds are low and the debts are high
And you want to smile, but you have to sigh,
When care is pressing you down a bit,
Rest, if you must but don't you quit.
Life is queer with its twists and turns,
As everyone of us sometimes learns.
And many a failure turns about
When he might have won had he stuck it out;
Don't give up though the pace seems slow-
You may succeed with another blow.
Success is failure turned inside out-
The silver tint of the clouds of doubt.
And you never can tell how close you are,
It may be near when it seems so far;
So stick to the fight when you're hardest hit-
It's when things seem worst that
you must not quit."

I found this poem the other day when I was looking for something else. I never find what I am looking for but I was thrilled to find "Don't Quit." I published it with the hope it could  help  some of you as it did me. I used it to keep me going in college. You may think it is silly but it did help me considerably. Every time I reached the point I wanted to give up I would read it. It gave me the courage to continue on. Come on now ---I did graduate with Honors (3.8 GPA).  

If any of you have any to share, we would love to print them.  We want you to feel a part of Medical Assisted Treatment. If you would like to share any news article, an editorial, your biography, a poem or an experience.  Send them to me and I would be happy to share them with all our visitors.         

I am answering a question asked by a patient.  I think it is one we all should be aware of.  Many of us have no idea how addictive some of the medications are until we stop taking them. 


The following is a list of symptoms.  As they have been reported by enough individuals they are statistically likely to be legitimate withdrawal symptoms. Keep in mind that there are a wide variety of other symptoms that have been reported that may be legitimate withdrawal symptoms as well, but have not been reported by enough individuals to be statistically significant.

The determination of statistical significance is not based on hard data, but on the observations of this author in reading through thousands of posts from people in withdrawal, as well as several books and articles on the subject.

This list is broken down into psychological and physical symptoms. The double asterisk (**) indicates symptoms that occur to some degree or another, at one time or another, in virtually every person experiencing benzodiazepine with-drawal. Single asterisk (*) are symptoms that are common, and occur in most people.  Others are symptoms that are common enough to be verifiable with-drawal symptoms, but probably occur in a minority of cases.

Psychological symptoms: anxiety** (including panic attacks), depression**, insomnia*, derealisation/depersonalisation* (feelings of unreality/detachment from self), obsessive negative thoughts*, (particularly of a violent and/or sexual nature) rapid mood changes* (especially including outbursts of anger or rage), phobias* (especially agoraphobia and fear of insanity), dysphoria* (loss of capacity to enjoy life; possibility a combination of depression, anxiety, and derealisation/depersonalisation), impairment of cognitive functioning*, suicidal thoughts*, nightmares, hallucinations, psychosis, pill cravings.

Physical Symptoms: abnormal sensitivity to sensory stimuli* (such as loud noise or bright light), muscle tension/pain**, joint pain*, tinnitus*, headaches*, shaking/tremors*, blurred vision* (and other complications related to the eyes), itchy skin* (including formication, ie sensations of insects crawling on skin), gastrointestinal discomfort*, electric shock sensations*, paraesthesiae* (numbness and pins and needles, especially in extremities), fatigue*, weakness in the extremities* (particularly the legs), feelings of inner vibrations* (especially in the torso), sweating, fluctuations in body temperature, difficulty in swallowing, loss of appetite, "flu like" symptoms, fasciculations (muscle twitching), metallic taste in mouth, nausea, extreme thirst (including dry mouth and increased frequency of urination), sexual dysfunction (or occasional increase in libido), heart palpitations, dizziness, vertigo, breathlessness.

Source:  http://www.benzo.org.uk


Think about what your take.  If you can possibly survive without the medication
-choose to do so especially if it has withdrawal symptoms.  Some of us may not have a choice but it is not true with all of us. 

Memorial Day is just around the corner therefore I would like to take the time to thank all of our Veterans. I would like to take the time to remember my husband who died from exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam.  -- He died from Leukemia at forty-two years old.  Let's not forget all those who served with courage.  They deserve to be remembered.  I am going to end with a "Thank-You."

Thanks to all serving in Iraq and
to all who died defending "Our
Freedom."

"Thank You" from all of us at
Medical Assisted Treatment of
America.

We have our life-thanks to your
sacrifice.   

Deborah Shrira           "The Director's View"                May 2008©    

Top